One Sudan one flag for all of us

One Sudan  one flag for all of us

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Sudanese History (About Sudan (1))



 
Identification. In the Middle Ages, Arabs named the area that is present-day Sudan "Bilad al-Sudan," or "land of the black people." The north is primarily Arab Muslims, whereas the south is largely black African, and not Muslim. There is strong animosity between the two groups and each has its own culture and traditions. While there is more than one group in the south, their common dislike for the northern Arabs has proved a uniting force among these groups.
Location and Geography. Sudan is in Africa, south of Egypt. It shares borders with Egypt, Libya, Chad, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, Kenya, and Ethiopia. It is the largest country in Africa and the ninth largest in the world, covering one million square miles (2.59 million square kilometers). The White Nile flows though the country, emptying into Lake Nubia in the north, the largest manmade lake in the world. The northern part of the country is desert, spotted with oases, where most of the population is concentrated. To the east, the Red Sea Hills support some vegetation. The central region is mainly high, sandy plains. The southern region includes grasslands, and along the border with Uganda the Democratic Republic of the Congo, dense forests. The southern part of the country consists of a basin drained by the Nile, as well as a plateau, and mountains, which mark the southern border. These include Mount Kinyeti, the highest peak in Sudan. Rainfall is extremely rare in the north but profuse in the south, which has a wet season lasting six to nine months. The central region of the country generally gets enough rain to support agriculture, but it experienced droughts in the 1980s and 1990s. The country supports a variety of wildlife, including crocodiles and hippopotamuses in the rivers, elephants (mainly in the south), giraffes, lions, leopards, tropical birds, and several species of poisonous reptiles.
The capital, Khartoum, lies at the meeting point of the White and Blue Niles, and together with Khartoum North and Omdurman forms an urban center known as "the three towns," with a combined population of 2.5 million people. Khartoum is the center for commerce and government; Omdurman is the official capital; and North Khartoum is the industrial center, home to 70 percent of Sudan's industry.
Demography. Sudan has a population of 33.5 million. Fifty-two percent of the population are black and 39 percent are Arab. Six percent are Beja, 2 percent are foreign, and the remaining 1 percent are composed of other ethnicities. There are more than fifty different tribes. These include the Jamala and the Nubians in the north; the Beja in the Red Sea Hills; and several Nilotic peoples in the south, including the Azande, Dinka, Nuer, and Shilluk. Despite a devastating civil war and a number of natural disasters, the population has an average growth rate of 3 percent. There is also a steady rural-urban migration.
Linguistic Affiliation. There are more than one hundred different indigenous languages spoken in Sudan, including Nubian, Ta Bedawie, and dialects of Nilotic and Nilo-Hamitic languages. Arabic is the official language, spoken by more than half of the population. English is being phased out as a foreign language taught in the schools, although it is still spoken by some people.
Symbolism. The flag adopted at independence had three horizontal stripes: blue, symbolizing the Nile

Read more: Culture of Sudan - traditional, history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs http://www.everyculture.com/Sa-Th/Sudan.html#ixzz1LeTCcwFF

Population of Sudan
Census of 1983 set population at 21.6 millioeople; July 1999 population estimate approximately 30 million. Annual growth rate between 2.8 and 3.1 percent. Half of population under eighteen years of age. About 20 percent of population urban, concentrated chiefly in three cities--Khartoum, Omdurman, and Khartoum North--constituting national capital area.


 
 

Link  for more info about sudan
http://www.mongabay.com/reference/country_studies/sudan/HISTORY.html

http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/5424.htm

http://oi.uchicago.edu/research/projects/nub/

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11147a.htm

http://www.sudarchrs.org.uk/

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/571417/The-Sudan/281162/History?anchor=ref48892

http://www.worldrover.com/history/sudan_history.html

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Some Sudanese Products for Sale

Sudanese Traditional Perfume  الارياح السودانية التقليدية  


 Khomra                 
لدينا 4 انواع من الخمرة

المحلب والضفرة والمسك والمشكلة

سعر البيع حسب كمية الوزن نحن نزن بالمل
1.15m $15+shipping

2.25ml $30+Shipping

3.50ml $60 +Shipping

4.100ml $100 +Shipping

Depend on how many MLyou pay price from $15 to $100

we sale 4type Dofra one /Mahjlab/Misik/Mixed one/ Plus shipping and Haddling



Sudanese Henna is natural, without chemicals. 

 

Hibiscus tea/Karkadi
Hibiscus tea is the infusion made from the calyces (sepals) of the Hibiscus sabdariffa flower, an herbal tea drink consumed both hot and cold by people around the world. It is also referred to as roselle (another common name for the hibiscus flower), flor de Jamaica in Latin America, karkadé in Egypt and Sudan, bissap in West Africa, sorrel in Jamaica, and red sorrel in the wider Caribbean, and other names in other regions. Hibiscus tea has a tart, cranberry-like flavor, and sugar is often added to sweeten the beverage. The tea contains vitamin C and minerals and is used traditionally as a mild medicine.
Hibiscus tea contains 15-30% organic acids, including citric acid, maleic acid, and tartaric acid. It also contains acidic polysaccharides and flavonoid glycosides, such as cyanidin and delphinidin, that give it its characteristic deep red colour.





Bint El Sudan


 NOTE: When I first acquired a bottle of Bint El Sudan, I knew nothing of its history and wrote my article based on a small knowledge of W.J. Bush & Co. and some surmised about this perfume. Some time after the first version of my story appeared, I was contacted by Mr. Tony Bate, grandson of Eric Burgess, a W.J. Bush & Co. salesman for 50 years and the "instigator" of Bint El Sudan. Mr. Bate provided me with some fascinating information about his grandfather — and the history of Bint El Sudan — which I have used to revise this article. Bint el Sudan perfume is still the top selling perfume in Africa, spically in sudan is one of traditional products and very importnace in sudanese perfume and home sences products.

Bint El Sudan, Side View

                       Eric Burgess, "instigator" of Bint El Sudan perfume.


Bint El Sudan, non-alcoholic perfume

by W.J. Bush & Co.

The story of Bint El Sudan perfume starts with a young Englishman, Eric Burgess (1891-1977) who, at the age of 16, joined the firm of W.J. Bush & Co. where his father was to become a director.
Starting as a "tea boy" (gofer), Eric Burgess soon became a commission salesman. Having been educated in Geneva where the family had a home, Burgess had gained a reputation for fluency in languages. W.J. Bush & Co. made good use of this talent by sending him to foreign lands. Between 1919 and 1920, Eric Burgess found himself in the Sudan.

The story that follows appears to have been told by Burgess himself in several versions. The basic outline is as follows: One blazingly hot day in Khartoum, a band of men "looking like brigands from Omdurman" crowed into the small office of W.J. Bush & Co's local representative. After squatting on the floor and serving tea, they produced a number of vials of exotic fragrance materials. Their desire was to have them made into a perfume
Burgess delivered these vials to the W.J. Bush & Co. laboratories where they were blended into a fragrance — that was too costly for the market! Substitutions were made and a sensible price point was achieved. Bint El Sudan was born!

Introduced in 1920, Bint El Sudan became an amazing hit with its fame spreading east across Africa and west across the Arab Middle East. In keeping with the prohibition enforced by some Muslims, Bint El Sudan was manufactured without alcohol. It's heavy aroma never found favor in Europe but, in the warmer climates where stronger fragrances were favored, Bint El Sudan became a runaway best seller. In time it became the world's best selling, non alcoholic perfume and as recently as the early 1970's, some claim that Bint El Sudan was the world's best selling perfume without exception.

The name Bint El Sudan and the artwork on the bottle are closely connected. "Bint" is Arabic for "daughter" or "maiden" — hence "Bint El Sudan" becomes "Daughter of Sudan", "Sudanese Maiden" or "Sudanese Girl". As to the young woman on the bottle, the artwork was prepared from a photograph Burgess, an amateur photographer, had taken of three Sudanese teenagers (princesses, according to Burgess family tradition) clothed in elephant hair skirts.

The fame of Bint El Sudan became such that it drew counterfeiters who sometimes substituted kerosene for the genuine fragrance. Eric Burgess himself was personally responsible for crackdowns on counterfeiters who, when caught in a British territory, were likely to find themselves jailed.

Today replicas of Bint El Sudan perfume oil are widely available on the internet.

In 1961, W.J. Bush & Co. was sold to Albright & Wilson. In 1966, Albright & Wilson sold it and it became the "Bush" in Bush Boake Allen which, in 2000, became part of International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF).

If you have any comments about Bint El Sudan or W.J. Bush & Co., please share them with us using the message sender below.

introduced in 1920, Bint El Sudan became an amazing hit with its fame spreading east across Africa and west across the Arab Middle East. In keeping with the prohibition enforced by some Muslims, Bint El Sudan was manufactured without alcohol. It's heavy aroma never found favor in Europe but, in the warmer climates where stronger fragrances were favored, Bint El Sudan became a runaway best seller. In time it became the world's best selling, non alcoholic perfume and as recently as the early 1970's, some claim that Bint El Sudan was the world's best selling perfume without exception.

he name Bint El Sudan and the artwork on the bottle are closely connected. "Bint" is Arabic for "daughter" or "maiden" — hence "Bint El Sudan" becomes "Daughter of Sudan", "Sudanese Maiden" or "Sudanese Girl". As to the young woman on the bottle, the artwork was prepared from a photograph Burgess, an amateur photographer, had taken of three Sudanese teenagers (princesses, according to Burgess family tradition) clothed in elephant hair skirts.

References for more info about this topic please check this webs:
http://www.perfumeprojects.com/museum/bottles/Bint_El_Sudan.shtml



http://alisonbate.ca/2011/03/22/surprise-in-the-souk/2/

  To pay bintelsudan in North America
                                                   http://www.bitmaklayenterprises.yolasite.com/